0 comments on “7 Reasons Why Food Trucks Are The Best Invention To Hit NYC”

7 Reasons Why Food Trucks Are The Best Invention To Hit NYC

By Anna Lesser 

Wouldn’t your life be much easier if a food truck could magically appear by your office? Oh wait. It can be!! Here are the top 7 reasons food trucks were the best thing to hit the streets of NYC.

1) You get to stand in line and socialize with real people. Outdoors. In the sun.

Tumblr Employees
Tumblr Employees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2) You get to eat food that looks like this:

Frites'N'Meats Burger
Frites’N’Meats Burger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3) …..and this:

Neapolitan Pizza
Neapolitan Pizza

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4) People will ask to take your picture and you will feel famous (and glamorous) for 15 seconds

Tumblr Employee
Tumblr Employee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5) You look like an absolute stud eating it:

Frites'N'Meats Burger
Frites’N’Meats Burger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6) You can look cool while carrying delicious pizza to the office:

Tumblr Employee
Tumblr Employee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7) Finally, if you work at Tumblr, you can look like this. Nuff said.

Tumblr Employees
Tumblr Employees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’re wondering how to look like this and eat delicious food truck food, fear not, we have the answer for you! Contact us at catering@foodtoeat.com to have the food truck of your dreams come to your office! It’s easy, affordable, and clearly the what the cool kids are doing.

 

DailyFoodtoEat is the official blog of FoodtoEat, a socially conscious online food ordering and concierge catering service featuring your favorite restaurants, food trucks and caterers. Check out the deliciousness here: http://www.foodtoeat.com

0 comments on “Not Your Average Hot Dog: Papaya King Truck Takes On NYC”

Not Your Average Hot Dog: Papaya King Truck Takes On NYC

By Anna Lesser

Behind the Food Truck is a FoodtoEat original series where we meet the amazing men and women behind our favorite mobile cuisines and share their inspiring stories. At FoodtoEat, we’re lucky to have the best food trucks NYC has to offer in our family. Here are their stories.

Photo Credit: Papaya King
The brand new Papaya King Truck | Photo credit: Papaya King

If you haven’t heard yet, Papaya King, the well-known NYC hot dog and fruity drinks restaurant now has its own food truck bringing hot dog loving to the streets.

Let’s rewind about 80 years ago. It’s 1932 and Gus Poulos, the founder, literally the “Papaya King” if you will, discovered papaya on a vacation to Miami. He shortly began importing the fruit to New York to make his own tropical drink. A great idea, but sadly no one came to try the drink so Gus decided to dress girls up in hula skirts and gave the drinks away for free – creative marketing for that time. New Yorkers quickly became hooked. He was inspired by his girlfriend to bring frankfurters to his juice stand on 86th and 3rd Avenue. And that was the birth of a NYC classic.

Wayne Rosenbaum, President and Jason Witkes, Marketing Manager

Along with their two locations on 86th and Marks Place, their bright yellow truck can be found roaming around midtown and sometimes at The Seaport.

Last week, we sat down with Wayne Rosenbaum and Jason Witkes of Papaya King to chat about their new food truck (and they fed us amazing hot dogs and fried oreos!). Wayne is really enjoying the food truck business so far. “I love it! It’s definitely different than the store, a lot more logistically challenging because of space, but we have the same methods as we do in the store. Everything is exactly the same, ” he said enthusiastically.

Wayne’s love for hot dogs sparked his creative imagination while experimenting with new recipes. His newest addition to the food truck, The Crunchy Munch, is one hot dog you definitely do not want to miss. Filled with jalapeños, sweetened pickles, sautéed onions, and crunchy potato sticks, your taste buds will be in hot dog heaven.

In New York, there are millions of places to grab a hot dog on the go, but none of them beats Papaya King, an establishment so intricately connected to the city and the heart of food entrepreneurs; a man who started with just a juice stand, ended up creating a delicious empire and now is returning to its roots and back to the streets with a food truck. Wayne says, “We have been an 82-year old brand, since 1932. So with that we are the first branded hot dog truck in history in New York.” You don’t hear that everyday from a hot dog restaurant!

Papaya King Hot Dog, Photo Credit: Papaya King
Papaya King’s Custom Hot Dogs – perfection | Photo credit: Papaya King

Wayne and Jason have their hot dog system down to a science. New York now has its options between St. Marks place, 86th street, or their new restaurant on wheels! At the end of the day, Papaya King is a fun restaurant and food truck where there is a flavorful mix of hot dogs and fruity drinks that will leave you wanting more.

We’re excited to welcome Papaya King to the FoodtoEat family, where they will be helping us feed hot dogs and fruity drinks to people all over the city. Contact us at catering@foodtoeat.com if you want Papaya King Food Truck to cater your next event!

DailyFoodtoEat is the official blog of FoodtoEat, a socially conscious online food ordering and concierge catering service featuring your favorite restaurants, food trucks and caterers. Check out the deliciousness here: http://www.foodtoeat.com

0 comments on “The Top 3 Most Delicious “American” Food Trucks in NYC”

The Top 3 Most Delicious “American” Food Trucks in NYC

By Anna Lesser

On July 4th, family and friends will gather to watch phenomenal fireworks, participate in entertaining parades, and most importantly, eat until our stomachs can’t take it anymore. Here are the top three most patriotic food trucks serving delicious, classic American food:

Milk Truck: Grilled Cheese

The 1920s brought an exciting moment to America: the invention of the grilled cheese sandwich, also known as cheese dream. The inexpensive bread and American cheese became easily accessible during the Great Depression. Let’s take a moment to thank the inventor of this magical sandwich that we love dearly.

Three Cheese Grilled Cheese
Three Cheese Grilled Cheese with Caramelized Apples

If you’re looking for a cheesy delight, Milk Truck is the way to go. Their hand cut bread and creative ingredients ensure a taste that you won’t want to miss out on.

Phil’s Steaks: Philly Cheesesteak

We have to thank Pat and Harry Olivieri for stumbling upon the creation of the Philly Cheesesteak sandwich in the 1930s. They originally owned a hotdog stand, but decided to experiment by making a sandwich with chopped beef and grilled onions. It was a cab driver passing by that convinced them to start selling this exquisite new sandwich.

Phil's Whiz Steak
Phil’s Whiz Steak

If you’re looking to try one of the top Philly Cheesesteak sandwiches in New York City, be sure to check out Phil’s Steaks. Their 100% premium loin-tail beef on Amoroso rolls, direct from Philly, allows for a sensational combination.

Yankee Doodle Dandy’s: Southern Fried Chicken

Known as NYC’s All-American food truck, from the name  to the decor of the truck (see below!), Yankee Doodle Dandy’s is probably the most patriotic food truck roaming the streets of NYC.

Winner Winner
Winner Winner Chicken Platter from Yankee Doodle Dandy’s

Their menu offers an excellent American combination of Southern goodness ranging from Buffalo Soldier to America the Beautiful Salad (yes, even the names are patriotic).  The Winner Winner fried chicken special is heavenly. Be sure to check out Yankee Doodle Dandy’s for a delicious treat to celebrate America’s favorite holiday.

Yankee Doodle Dandy's
Yankee Doodle Dandy’s | Photo credit: CBS Local

DailyFoodtoEat is the official blog of FoodtoEat, a socially conscious online food ordering and concierge catering service featuring your favorite restaurants, food trucks and caterers. Check out the deliciousness here: www.foodtoeat.com

0 comments on “Food Trucks in Portland Maine Barely Scraping By”

Food Trucks in Portland Maine Barely Scraping By

Portland, Maine recently hosted two food trucks as part of the Food network’s “Great Food Truck Race”, though both trucks had to be granted special temporary city ordinances in order to operate. Presently, Portland forbids food trucks and any other mobile vendors to operate within the city.

However, recent negotiations between the City Council may change this ordinance to allow food trucks to operate within Portland, though not without some serious restrictions. Under the proposed ordinance food trucks will only be able to operate within very limited spaces, and will be required to stay 200 feet away from any brick-and-mortar restaurant. Ultimately it will be very difficult for food trucks to find parking in commercial areas and be able to serve crowds.

Some food trucks may be able to sustain their businesses this way, but the vast majority will not be able to compete for parking spaces and thrive off of the meager customers they might attract. This new regulation is designed with the interests of restaurants in mind, and aims to protect them from increased food truck competition.

Councilor David Marshall essentially agreed that it would be difficult for food trucks to operate with this new ordinance. “I don’t expect to see a huge number of food trucks. It’s going to be a challenging business to operate.”

Portland City Council members are under the impression that restaurants have an inherent disadvantage to food trucks because of their lack of mobility, and thus the government is necessary to rectify these advantages. However restaurants have many advantages over food trucks as well. Restaurants have much bigger kitchens than food trucks, with bigger menus as well; they have more storage for inventory, proper seating areas for customers to dine-in, and the protection of a brick-and-mortar location to shield them from seasonal changes.

However the Portland government still seeks to protect restaurants from food trucks, rather than looking at successful food truck cities like Los Angeles, Austin and Washington D.C.  In other cities food truck have not caused restaurants to go out of business, but rather improved the overall dining scene by urging restaurants to improve on their selections. There is also a large crossover between restaurant and food truck owners, as many successful food trucks establish brick-and-mortar locations, and many successful restaurants develop food trucks for marketing purposes.

Food trucks are doing what little they can to fight back against some of these ordinances, with federal courts becoming involved on occasion. Food trucks argue against protectionist laws that limit their ability to achieve success apart from arbitrary government influence. Although Portland has come a long way in simply allowing food trucks to operate within the city, they will fail to replicate the successful food truck models in other cities in which restaurants and food trucks coexist.

DailyFoodtoEat is the official blog of FoodtoEat, a sustainable online food ordering and concierge catering service featuring your favorite restaurants, food trucks and caterers. Check out the deliciousness here: www.foodtoeat.com

 

0 comments on “The Great Food Truck Race Finale”

The Great Food Truck Race Finale

In the final lap of the Great Food Truck Race, the last two trucks remaining, California’s Lime Truck and Ohio’s Hodge Podge Truck head to Miami for the ultimate showdown and a chance at $100,000. The episode kicked off with Tyler Florence giving each team $500 to buy ingredients, with the ultimate goal of making $15,000. The first team to reach this mark would then race to South Point Park to claim a briefcase with their cash, and win the Great Food Truck Race.

Hodge Podge immediately began to use their Miami connections to find a food truck meet up spot, while Lime Truck was expecting a Truck Stop challenge first to give them time to prepare their plan of attack in Miami, but was instead thrown for a loop when the elimination challenge immediately kicked off. Just as the trucks begin to get settled, Tyler calls them for a Speed Bump. The trucks are towed and the teams can only get them back with $200, which they must earn somehow without the truck. The teams kept their ingredients however, and Hodge Podge was able to sell some high end plates while Lime Truck attempted to offer lessons in cooking mussels, taking much longer to earn their truck back.

The next morning the Truck Stop challenge was presented, with both teams having to catch a fish in thirty minutes and then cook a dish with it in thirty minutes. Though challenging, both teams managed to catch their fish, and though Hodge Podge’s was cooked perfectly, Chef Chris used too many ingredients, while Lime Truck’s was just right. Lime Truck won $1500, helping them out of the hole they found themselves in after the first day of competition. At the end of the day the teams were notified of a second Speed Bump, both teams would have to reopen as a dessert truck for two hours in the morning. Both teams were extremely close to the $15000 mark by now, and Lime truck headed downtown to sell their desserts, while Hodge Podge stayed in the parking lot of the wholesale store they bought their ingredients from. Both teams sold well in these spots, though editing made it to difficult to tell how close the trucks actually were to each other in sales. In the end both trucks raced to see Tyler for their briefcase, but Lime truck arrived first winning the $100,000 prize. Though Hodge Podge only lost by a few minutes, they admitted to feeling like winners anyway.

Congratulations to Lime Truck for dominating this season of the Great Food Truck Race, and to all the other trucks as well for providing excitement and competition throughout the season.

DailyFoodtoEat is the official blog of FoodtoEat, a sustainable online food ordering and concierge catering service featuring your favorite restaurants, food trucks and caterers. Check out the deliciousness here: www.foodtoeat.com

0 comments on “The Great Food Truck Race Week 6: Nothing’s too ‘Peachy’ in Atlanta”

The Great Food Truck Race Week 6: Nothing’s too ‘Peachy’ in Atlanta

After last week’s controversial elimination of Korilla BBQ, the three remaining trucks (Roxy’s Grilled Cheese, Hodge Podge and Lime Truck) headed to Atlanta, Georgia, where the pressure was greater than ever before. Host Tyler Florence immediately amped up the tension, introducing each remaining truck and then referring to Hodge Podge as “just plain lucky to be there” after making the least sales last week.

At the Truck Stop challenge the teams were tasked with creating a signature dish with peanuts and peaches, traditional favorite from Georgia. The dishes were judged by Atlanta restaurateur Kevin Rathbun and Roxy’s was chosen as the winner of the challenge, presented with a ‘golden peach’ worth $1,000 at the end of the challenge. As the elimination challenge kicked off, Hodge Podge immediately secured a great spot at Atlantic Station, experiencing their best day yet. Roxy’s first location was too quiet, so they relocated to midtown. Lime set up outside an office building facing two crowded intersections, but decided to find a new location are slow sales. They finally got in touch with Atlantic Station and were offered Hodge Podge’s spot for the next day. They eventually returned to their previous location, and Roxy’s experienced a surge in sales later in the day.

The next day’s Speed Bump called for the head chefs to be sent off the trucks for a full day of pampering and relaxation. Lime Truck considered this a huge advantage, being the only team with two chefs, and Roxy’s Grilled Cheese felt confident. The two ladies of Hodge Podge however were shaken up by the change but decided to keep their menu simple with fried chicken, pulled pork and fish tacos. Roxy’s had solid sales all day, and Hodge Podge decided to do what Lime Truck does best, and poached some customer’s off them, though their sales weren’t great anyway. Finally the head chefs returned to their trucks to finish out their day.

At the end of the day Hodge Podge won their first ever challenge, pulling in nearly $9,000. Even with Roxy’s $1,000 head start they still could not beat Lime Truck’s sales, and were sent back to Boston. Next week the two final trucks face off in the finale, and from what we’ve seen in the preview, it looks to be epic.

DailyFoodtoEat is the official blog of FoodtoEat, a sustainable online food ordering and concierge catering service featuring your favorite restaurants, food trucks and caterers. Check out the deliciousness here: www.foodtoeat.com

1 comment on “The Great Food Truck Race Week 5: It All Goes South in Memphis”

The Great Food Truck Race Week 5: It All Goes South in Memphis

This week on The Great Food Truck Race the four remaining teams headed to Memphis, where a series of twists and turns led to a shocking elimination. After Seabird’s exit last week, Lime Truck was somewhat shaken by nearly being sent home, but came back with a renewed energy and killer menu. Once the teams arrived they were given ingredients to create their own barbecue sauce, as well as butcher a 100 pound hog, smoke it and serve it with their newly-made barbecue sauce. Memphis BBQ veteran Jim Neely judged teams’ work and proclaimed Roxy’s the winner of the challenge. For winning, Roxy got $500 additional seed money and a head start in the elimination challenge while the other three teams had to clean up the rest of the hog to donate to a local food bank.

Each team was given $500 to start, more than in previous weeks, and Roxy’s immediately parked downtown to set up their truck. Hodge Podge parked by a restaurant they had a connection with, Lime parked outside Bluefin Restaurant where they purchased seafood for their menu, and Korilla headed to Beale Street, where for the first time in the competition they found they weren’t in a great location, with only a small line. Hodge Podge managed to open first; even beating Roxy’s which had a significant head start.

In the Speed Bump, Tyler Florence told the teams they would have to switch to an entirely vegetarian menu. Roxy’s and Lime transitioned immediately, even though Lime Truck spent a good amount of their seed money on seafood. Hodge Podge closed to visit a grocery store and rethink their menu, while Korilla got tofu delivered to them for tofu tacos. The next day a local blogger called the Chubby Vegetarian was sent to try food from each truck and lend them some publicity, and the truck he declared the winner would be safe from elimination. As the day winded down, Roxy’s had the longest consistent line so the other three trucks went to a park where a concert was being held for more business, but the crowd was not as large as expected. Hodge Podge lost electricity, and all three trucks felt they had under-performed this week.

As the elimination finally approached, Tyler Florence warned the trucks that today would not be a good day for them. First he announced that the Chubby Vegetarian announced the Lime Truck as the winner, saving them from elimination. The blogger remarked that the Lime Truck’s food was some of the best food he’d ever had. Tyler ten announced that one of the teams tried to cheat; New York’s own Korilla BBQ put some of their own money in the cash box to increase profits, violating the rules. Even though Hodge Podge had the lowest sales for the week, Korilla was eliminated for cheating.

Next week the three remaining teams head to Atlanta, Georgia. For full coverage of The Great Food Truck Race click here.

DailyFoodtoEat is the official blog of FoodtoEat, a sustainable online food ordering and concierge catering service featuring your favorite restaurants, food trucks and caterers. Check out the deliciousness here: www.foodtoeat.com

1 comment on “The Great Food Truck Race Week 4: The Truck’s Get Schooled in Kansas College Town”

The Great Food Truck Race Week 4: The Truck’s Get Schooled in Kansas College Town

This week the five remaining teams drove out to the college town of Manhattan, Kansas, where they faced a series of challenges ultimately resulting in one team being eliminated. After dominating performances last week and weeks before that, Lime Truck was bested in the first Truck Stop challenge by Seabirds Truck. The teams were all granted a $5 debit card to come up with an original recipe and impress a Kansas City food critic. The Seabirds created a raw food cupcake with barbecue sauce, and they were awarded exclusive access to a huge restaurant/bar area, while the rest of the trucks duked it out for space on campus.

The teams were each given $400 to plan their menus for the elimination phase of the challenge. Seabirds had a huge crowd waiting for them after shopping, Roxy’s pulled away from the rest and the other three teams set up at City Park, where college students had already anticipated their arrival. Tyler Florence introduced the speed bump early this time, immediately requiring the teams to price everything on their menu under $1. Some trucks with planned expensive menus had more trouble with this than others, but many made do. Korilla introduced $1 tacos, and Roxy’s made grilled cheese sliders. The Lime Truck based its menu off $8-$10 dollar items, and the Seabirds made $1 half sandwiches but worried that they were charging too little for their premium products, and began falling behind on their orders again. Several teams headed back to reconfigure their menus, while others targeted bar crowds and prepared for the next day.

The next day the teams faced similar large crowds, but the difficulty was in filling orders quickly and dealing with low the menu prices. Hodge Podge Truck began pulling customers off Korilla’s long lines to take orders. I thought a fight was about to break out when the Korilla guys confronted them about having no food truck etiquette in front of many customers, but Hodge Podge just kept taking the customers they could get.

In the end, Korilla BBQ came out on top again, with $5,245, and Roxy’s in a close second with $5,132. The Lime Truck and Seabirds were in the bottom 2, and in the end Seabirds got eliminated selling less than Hodge Podge and Lime truck. Next week the teams head to Memphis, Tennessee to create all vegetarian menus, as the Seabirds lament that they won’t be there for what could have been a triumphant week for them.

DailyFoodtoEat is the official blog of FoodtoEat, a sustainable online food ordering and concierge catering service featuring your favorite restaurants, food trucks and caterers. Check out the deliciousness here: www.foodtoeat.com

1 comment on “The Great Food Truck Race Week 3: Trucks Get Swept Away by the Windy City”

The Great Food Truck Race Week 3: Trucks Get Swept Away by the Windy City

Last night on The Great Food Truck Race the six remaining teams raced their way to Denver, Colorado, where they were granted even less money and more crippling speed bumps. Once again the teams had to utilize their own knowledge of the area and their local contacts to stay ahead of the competition, while making risky alliances with others.

The first truck stop challenge required the food trucks to create an original recipe based on wild mushrooms that they gathered themselves, and an assortment of vegetables provided by host Tyler Florence. Their dish would then be judged by local Denver chef, Frank Bonnano, and the winner would get some helpful publicity on Good Morning America, as well as $200 for the elimination phase of the show. After each team prepared their dishes, Bonnano gave them all praise but awarded Lime Truck the victory, leaving the vegan Seabirds Truck devastated that they lost a veggie-based challenge. All the trucks were soon devastated however; as they learned that they would receive no seed money and would have to find their own ingredients (except Lime truck).

Once again the food trucks proved their resourcefulness by gathering ingredients on their own. The Lime Truck and Hodge Podge formed an early alliance, though why Hodge Podge would ever trust these guys after what they did last week is beyond me. The trucks all loaned or struck deals with local establishments, to get ingredients. Café con Leche, Hodge Podge and Lime Truck all charged very high prices for sandwiches, and Seabirds suffered from slow service. Korilla BBQ eased along just fine in a great location, and Roxy’s Grilled Cheese noticed a significant recovery from last week’s near elimination.

The next day the trucks resumed their sales, but faced one of the show’s ‘speed bumps’ in which each truck would have to operate with only one person doing ll the work. The trucks all handled this differently, Korilla played rock, paper, scissors to decide who would operate the truck, Roxy’s called it “a nightmare”, Hodge Podge was confident, Lime took group orders over single orders, and Seabirds got even slower. As sales slowed and trucks relocated, Korilla and Roxy’s crashed Café con Leche’s location, and Seabirds lamented that this might be their last week.

When all was said and done however, Seabirds scraped a fifth place finish, while Lime and Korilla dominated the competition, each making near $7,000. Café con Leche was sent home, losing only by $87 and noting that the high bill they owed to the restaurant that lent them food probably cost them the game. Next week the five remaining trucks head to Manhattan, Illinois, a college town where no doubt they will create some delicious munchie food for their ravenous customers.

DailyFoodtoEat is the official blog of FoodtoEat, a sustainable online food ordering and concierge catering service featuring your favorite restaurants, food trucks and caterers. Check out the deliciousness here: www.foodtoeat.com

1 comment on “Week 2 of The Great Food Truck Race: Fear and Loathing in Salt Lake City”

Week 2 of The Great Food Truck Race: Fear and Loathing in Salt Lake City

This week on The Great Food Truck Race the seven remaining teams head to Salt Lake City, after a tough first episode in Las Vegas where Sky’s Gourmet Taco’s was eliminated. This week the teams were handed only $100 each for ingredients, which makes preparation considerably more difficult. First off the teams were told to compete in a sausage making challenge, where they toured a local sausage establishment to come up with their own original recipes. Korilla BBQ showed their ingenuity and flexed their Columbia University degrees by bowing out of the mini competition to save their sausage for the sales part later. Host Tyler Florence noted that it was a good move, but also could have got them disqualified.

The vegan Seabirds Truck also had trouble with this competition, as sausage isn’t exactly allowed in vegan cooking. Seabirds’ Stephanie Morgan said however, “Everybody’s already assuming we’re going to lose this competition, since they think there’s no way you can make vegan sausage, but there is,” Stephanie says. “We’re going to take the garbanzo beans and mash them all up, and add lots of bold spices to mimic that sausage flavor.” Unfortunately their bean-sausage that looked nothing like sausage wasn’t enough to win this competition. The Hodge Podge Truck, the only truck which had previous experience making sausage, swept this competition and was granted an extra $100 for ingredients and avoided the later ‘speed bump’.

The Seabirds Truck thought to continue their alliance with cocky Lime Truck, and invited them to a pet adoption drive they found out about. The Lime Truck then contacted the owners of the drive and signed a contract to be the sole food truck there, putting an end to this alliance. The Seabirds Truck got lucky though, finding a café known to be frequented by young people and vegans, and attracted a sizeable crowd there. Café con Leche thought well ahead this time, partnering with a local Mexican restaurant to do catering a party. Meanwhile Roxy’s Gourmet Grilled Cheese had the same problem as last week, wondering whether they had enough food to match their customers’ demand.

This week’s Speed Bump made each team move one mile from their current location, forcing many trucks to abandon healthy lines and head to deserted areas. Some trucks managed to retain their customers, but many lost them entirely. Korilla BBQ dominated sales this week, showing that their early strategy paid off best. Roxy’s and Devilicious were only $159 apart in sales, but Devilicious was sent home. Devilicious may have sealed their own fate by offering $1 off each of their meals, focusing more on volume than cash. Next week the teams head to Denver, Colorado, where growing disputes will no doubt continue. The Lime Truck and Roxy’s continue to battle over parking spaces, and Lime Truck’s bold attitude against Roxy’s tough demeanor should make for some great television.

DailyFoodtoEat is the official blog of FoodtoEat, a sustainable online food ordering and concierge catering service featuring your favorite restaurants, food trucks and caterers. Check out the deliciousness here: www.foodtoeat.com