0 comments on “The Common Mistakes Of Diversity and Inclusion Among Our Workplace”

The Common Mistakes Of Diversity and Inclusion Among Our Workplace

Today’s society is being shaped by not only technological advancements, but also by the complex diversity of cultures that surrounds us. And because of that, there has been a huge focus on the importance of being inclusive and fair with employees. Many leaders think they know what diversity and inclusion means, and think they are doing an outstanding job at implementing it. But unfortunately they do not. And here is why.

The most common mistake many company leaders make is assuming these two concepts, diversity and inclusion, are the same or very similar. By being completely ignorant in what these two actually mean, it is impossible that such initiatives will actually work. Most leaders simply do the bare minimum to comply to the regulations of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and disregard to do deeper research on more substantial ways that benefit the current workplace culture. Many just want to be recognized on the typical BS “Top 100 D&I companies of 2019!”. To these leaders, “stop looking for recognition and start thinking how to earn the respect from the actual people in your workplace. Give them influence over the growth of the company” (Llopis, 2017). Make that change and you will find yourself involved in a very successful growth strategy.

So since ignorance is the main problem, let’s solve that. Diversity is mainly seen as bringing people with different skin colors, physical traits, ages, and gender to a work environment. But that is only the tip of the iceberg. People who want to diversify their workplace need to also look at invisible traits such as religion, socio-economic status, cultural and ethical values, work backgrounds, sexual orientation, and even geographic location. It is a collective mixture of differences and similarities that need to be embraced as a whole, not separately. Simply having a wide roster of demographic characteristics won’t make any difference to an organization’s bottom line. Having five colored skin individuals, two bisexuals, and a few female colleagues won’t cut it. It is crucial that besides those factors, you have individuals that encourage their participation, want to know their thought process, and promote innovation. And this is where inclusion finds its place.

Inclusion, on the other hand, is how people behave and ensure a welcomeness feeling to those who are “different”. In a more scientific term, inclusion is “the achievement of a work environment in which all individuals are treated fairly and respectfully, have equal access to opportunities and resources, and can contribute fully to the organization’s success” (SHRM).  Not including your employees will negatively impact your business by not allowing it to grow and having employees’ performances decrease. No statistics or fancy graphs need to be displayed here for you to know this is true. I am sure that you have felt not being included in some way – either a friend’s dinner you weren’t invited, a meeting you were not being listened, or even at work when a group of coworkers grabbed lunch without you. That moment sucked, right? Feeling left out feels so painful to us humans because our desire to belong is primal. From the beginning of our species as Homo habilis, we have been taught that in order to survive one must remain with the group. Being excluded meant missing out on resources and protection which led to, not being overly dramatic here but, death. Not saying this will happen to you if you get excluded…

Long story short, as FoodtoEat’s founder Deepti Sharma always says, “Diversity is being invited to the party. Inclusion is being asked to dance”. Last night she even hosted, along with Product of Culture, a communal table dinner event to promote D&I. Three distinct Immigrant NYC based chefs created a three course menu that highlighted their culture and later shared their personal stories with the group. The mission behind this dinner was, besides enjoying the delicious food, to have individuals understand they can in fact promote D&I besides the usual process of hiring women and people of color. They can do so in multiple ways, way funner, by using their purchasing power to invest in small businesses like of those three chefs – either attending their restaurants, ordering their food through FoodtoEat, or going to such dinner events!

Businesses have the transformative power to change and contribute to a more open, diverse and inclusive society. It is a no-brainer the benefits and financial impacts it has proven to our organizations. “Employees in inclusive environments feel appreciated for their unique characteristics and therefore comfortable sharing their ideas and other aspects of their true and authentic selves” (Washington and Patrick, 2018). Stirring away from like-mindedness and embracing and honoring other people’s differences should be the goal of many, or even all of us. Maximizing the full potential of the people and the business will drive growth, innovation and opportunity for both.

 

 

 

 

Citations
https://www.forbes.com/sites/glennllopis/2017/01/16/5-reasons-diversity-and-inclusion-fails/#2bda6a350dfe
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/04/business-case-for-diversity-in-the-workplace/
https://builtin.com/diversity-inclusion
https://www.gallup.com/workplace/242138/requirements-diverse-inclusive-culture.aspx
https://www.forbes.com/sites/danabrownlee/2019/09/15/the-dangers-of-mistaking-diversity-for-inclusion-in-the-workplace/#1411b1924d86
https://hbr.org/2017/02/diversity-doesnt-stick-without-inclusion

 

0 comments on “Plant-Based Companies: The Disruptors of Today’s Era”

Plant-Based Companies: The Disruptors of Today’s Era

From Del Taco, Qdoba Mexican Eats, Burger King and now McDonalds, vegetarian options are on the rise. With World Vegetarian Day on Tuesday, how could we not talk about it!? This phenomenon has become so widespread around the world, people are achieving this lifestyle without major difficulties. Everyone has probably come in contact with non-dairy milks and cheeses, coconut yoghurts, and imitations of beef, chicken, lamb, fish on any supermarket. The first trend came from people wanting to cut on animal products for their welfare. Some staggering numbers include:

  • 11 million people died in Hitler’s holocaust. The U.S. alone slaughters 112 million pigs per year – source
  • Every year, we slaughter 950 million birds for food consumption through electrical water baths or gas – source 
  • We kill between 1 and 2.8 trillion fish every year; 143-400x the amount of the entire human population – source
  • Domesticated cows have an average lifespan of 20 years; on dairy farms 5 years.

The trend eventually shifted from ethical reasons and religious convictions to concerns about personal health and most importantly, our planet. Some follow a vegetarian diet because they cannot afford to eat meat. But for whatever personal choice, you can’t deny “meatless Mondays” are not a thing.

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According to Dr. Springmann from Oxford University, “if the world went vegan, it could save 8 million human lives by 2050, reduce greenhouse emissions by 2/3 and avoid climate damages of $1.5 trillion”. Beyond Burger alone generated 90 percent less greenhouse gas emissions, required 46 percent less energy, and had far less impact on water and land use than the beef burger, said the New York Times. With an almost-full plant based diet, we will not only improve our environmental carbon footprint but also reduce the cost of food in developed and developing countries.

The Economist recently published that 25 percent of Americans (age range from 25-34 years old) identify themselves as vegan or vegetarian; New York City being the third most vegan-friendly city in America (HOORAY!). This number is exponentially growing, but unfortunately meat consumption is increasing worldwide especially in the Chinese market. It is yet unclear if whether plant-based proteins are replacing meat or if consumers are eating them in addition to meat. But in order to decrease meat consumers and the drastic climate changes occurring, plant-based companies have to continue making these products available, inexpensive, and tasty with the right texture. Otherwise, not many will be willing to make the change.

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A look at several datas have suggested, as you may all know, that improvement in health is in fact very true. Because vegetarians consume less saturated fat and cholesterol and receive more Vitamins C, E, fiber, folic acid, and potassium just to name a few, they have lower blood pressures, body mass index, and LDL ( bad cholesterol). A reduced risk of chronic diseases such as heart attacks, type-2 diabetes, and cancer as well as longevity are also associated with a vegetarian/vegan diet. And for both mind and body, you are what you eat. What we consume mentally influences how the mind feels—”pleasant and happy or roiling with indigestion”. Whole-food diets heavy on the fruits, vegetables, and unprocessed protein can lift our moods and protect us from depression.

Now let’s be honest. This article will probably not stop you from consuming animal protein products, but hopefully it will lean you to make some little shifts in your diet. Adopting an overall healthier diet will lead to reduce symptoms of depression, trouble sleeping and chronic diseases. And I mean, if there are so many articles talking about vegetarian/vegan diets then some of it must be true!

0 comments on “Climate Change: It is real, and it is happening.”

Climate Change: It is real, and it is happening.

“The ocean is warmer, more acidic and less productive. Melting glaciers and ice sheets are causing sea level rise. Through the last century, global sea level has rose about 8 inches.” – the report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) states.

“Glaciers are projected to lose more than 80 per cent of their current ice mass by 2100” – UN News

“Our world is now about one degree Celsius hotter than in the pre-industrial period” – Weiss, 2019.

“Tropical deforestation is now responsible for 11 percent of the world’s CO2 emissions” – UNGA

“Carbon emissions from global energy use jumped two per cent in 2018, according to BP’s annual world energy study. The unusual number of hot and cold days last year resulted in increased use of cooling and heating systems powered by natural gas and coal. The energy sector accounts for two-thirds of all carbon emissions” – BP Statistical Review of World Energy.

These are just a few of the million scientific statements that mention how climate change is real and it’s happening. But unfortunately, millions of individuals believe that climate change is a hoax. Some say it’s fake science, others do not believe it because of misleading articles written by unknowledgeable individuals, and some live in areas of the world that have not yet experienced severe changes. According to a research conducted at Yale University in 2014, only 63 percent of Americans believe that global warming is happening. This number is now lower after President Trump said he does not believe in it as well.

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So to give you an update, here is what you need to know on how our world is standing as of today:

  1. Our summers and winters keep getting warmer and warmer. 2018 was hotter than any year since 1850. The past four years have been the hottest years ever measured. “29 countries including France, Germany, Italy, Greece, and the United Arab Emirates hit 123 degrees Fahrenheit in June. Last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned that if global warming exceeds 1.5 degrees Celsius—just 0.4 degrees Celsius above where we are now—then widespread environmental upheaval could result. Perhaps as soon as 2040, climate change could leave hundreds of millions of people with scarce food and water” (Meyer, 2019).
  2. Wildlife population has dropped by 60 percent in just 40 years, according to the biennial Living Planet Report published by the Zoological Society of London and the WWF. An estimated 5 percent of all species would be threatened with extinction by 2 degree Celsius of warming above pre-industrial levels. Such damage to the ecosystem will increase poverty and hunger.
  3. The is more CO2 in our atmosphere than any time in human history. We have currently reached a CO2 concentration of 415.26 ppm. The last time Earth’s atmosphere contained this much CO2 was more than three million years ago. “Scientists have warned that carbon dioxide levels higher than 450ppm are likely to lock in catastrophic and irreversible changes in the climate” (Weiss, 2019).
  4. Ecological resources are depleting. Earth Overshoot Day marks the date when humanity’s demand for ecological resources and services in a given year exceeds what Earth can regenerate in that year. July 29th, 2019 was the day we used up all the regenerative resources from 2019. That means that from July 30th onwards, we are consuming more resources that the planet can regenerate in a year.
  5. “Two thirds of extreme weather events in the last 20 years were influenced by humans”( Carbon Brief, 2019). Climate change has led to heavier precipitations, more frequent hurricanes, higher seas, and flood consequences.
  6. Shrinkage of tropical forest. 120,000 square km of tropical forest was lost in 2018. Deforestation contributes to global carbon emissions because trees naturally capture and lock away carbon as they grow. As for recent news, tens of thousands of fires have been recorded across the Amazon forest. Various factors that increase fires in tropical forests include climate change, agricultural production such as palm oil and meat eating, and deforestation for city enhancements.

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With all this tragedy, we are fortunate to have strong, global organizations such as the United Nations whom are committed to avoid the worst effects yet to come of global warming. With the United Nations Climate Action Summit taking place this week, we will hopefully see some future changes made by presidents, prime ministers and corporate executives. “77 countries had announced efforts to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050, several asset fund managers said they would aim to get to a net-zero portfolio of investments by the same year, and dozens of businesses said they would aim to abide by the Paris Agreement targets”, said António Guterres (The United Nations secretary general).

But even if countries and organizations claim they will make the necessary efforts to reduce the effects of climate change, past evidence have shown us they do not move fast enough to hit the desired goals. Because of this reason, more than ever before, individual actions should be taking the pressure! During this week, streets around the world and in the U.S. have been filled with students and activists as part of a Global Climate Strike. Our founder, Deepti, joined thousand of others at Battery Place for the sake of her kids’ future. “I marched because our earth is on fire and we have to take action. I marched because my kid’s future depends on it. I took my kids because I wanted to show them activism in action. As a mother of two young boys, I want them to understand that they have the power to make a difference by leading or showing up for causes that matter to them. Recycling and using less plastic is NOT enough. We need to show up and rally to be heard. Activism WORKS” – Deepti Sharma. 

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Practical, implementable change on an individual level is what it is needed in order to see actual change. More practical solutions for governments, businesses and communities should be more showcased and educated so that they can be implemented at local and national levels. “The world can reverse this biodiversity crisis but doing so will require proactive environmental policies, the sustainable production of food and other resources and a concerted effort to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions” , said Jeff Tollefson.

So, what little step are you going to start taking to save our planet? If wanting to brainstorm, this article is perfect for simple, individual solutions that do not require much!

 

 

 

Citations
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/01/nasa-noaa-shutdown-2018-warmest-climate-record/581221/
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/03/its-getting-warmer-but-americans-may-never-notice-climate-change/583570/
https://www.wired.co.uk/article/climate-change-facts-2019
https://news.un.org/en/story/2019/09/1046712
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01448-4
https://www.carbonbrief.org/mapped-how-climate-change-affects-extreme-weather-around-the-world
https://www.carbonbrief.org/media-reaction-amazon-fires-and-climate-change
0 comments on “Break bread together, not alone.”

Break bread together, not alone.

“To eat is a necessity, but to eat intelligently is an art” – François de La Rochefoucau.

We live in an era were we spend more time communicating with each other through our smart devices than through physical contact. Let’s not even talk about how most of us prefer to sit in our work desks alone with our soggy lunches from last night’s leftovers instead of laughing about it with colleagues who also brought unsatisfied meals. Sadly, Americans rarely eat together anymore. “In fact, the average American eats one in every five meals in their car, one in four Americans eats at least one fast food meal every single day, and the majority of American families report eating a single meal together less than five days a week” (Delistraty, 2014). It is definitely a pity to see so many Americans missing out on an opportunity as small as a 15 minute break to simply relax and have a meaningful conversation with someone. And a meaningful conversation is just one of the multiple other benefits eating around a communal table can bring to an individual.

Unfortunately, in America it seems snobbish or unprofessional if you take more than 20 minutes to have your lunch. There is also a cultural misconception that only bourgeois families can afford to have family dinners as both parents are able to be at home for that time. It is true many cannot afford to have both parents stay at home to cook and spend a desirable amount with their children. But that does not mean there doesn’t exist a way to make up for that time, or even find it. We, individuals, always find the time for things that we feel important. Sacrifices have to be made, but for good causes. So yes, socioeconomic situations make it more difficult, but that should be of no excuse to let a child grow by himself. One does not need to spend an hour dining with their beloved. It is okay to have small meal times since we all have things to do. All that matters is putting in the effort.

Getting accustomed to eating alone has quantifiable negative effects both physically and psychologically. Many research studies mention how children who do not eat dinner with their parents at least twice a week were 40 percent more likely to be overweight since they make poor food choices by choosing convenience (McDonald’s) over quality (a homemade meal). On the other hand, those who do have less trouble with drugs and alcohol, eat healthier, show better academic performance and report being closer with their parents (Columbia University). Dining with others cultivates our minds, allows us to pay attention to the whole eating experience, strengthens relationships and builds new ones. The communal table acts as a unifier, a place of community. It is the perfect excuse to catch up and talk about life.

At one point, people saw communal tables at restaurants as retrograde, awkward and a painful experience. Restaurants wouldn’t dare placing a communal table as part of their setting. But people now clamor for more interaction in their daily lives – especially when living in such an exhausting city like New York. And so when the restaurant industry started to experiment and take the “risk”, it was a total success. From Starbucks to Le Pain Quotidien to Momofuku to Son of a Gun in LA, the communal tables have found their ways in all types of restaurants around the country. It is a win-win for both the restaurant and the individual: the restaurant does more covers in the same space (more money) and the individual expands his/her network of relationships.

Human connection is necessary for human evolution, and the dinner table does it better than almost any place. Our company, FoodtoEat, has partnered with Product of Culture in order to push this statement further and break barriers. For one night, Product of Culture and Food To Eat will create a communal dinner table for 50 people to have a culinary experience curated by NYC based immigrant chefs. The mission is to unite people around the communal table and add diversity to the food community by championing small businesses that offer a unique and delicious selection of cuisine from across the globe. This experience is much more than just eating healthy and delicious food. It is about grasping the experience of building a connection with a stranger and also going through the culinary journey of three distinct immigrant chefs. It is why this article started with a phrase from a 17th-century French writer. It mentions the necessity of eating intelligently, which is not only eating food that nourishes our bodies and souls. It is also psychologically speaking of sharing a meal with a friend, a family member, a roommate, or even a stranger. 

 

Citations
https://www.centeronaddiction.org/addiction-research/reports/importance-of-family-dinners-2012
https://labelleassiette.co.uk/blog/4-reasons-why-the-dining-table-will-always-be-important/
https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/07/the-importance-of-eating-together/374256/
https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/apr/14/health-benefits-eating-together/
https://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/a19532062/common-meal-prep-mistakes/
0 comments on “Mindful Meditation at Work: A Company’s Road to Success”

Mindful Meditation at Work: A Company’s Road to Success

Sadly, statistics show us that one in five New Yorkers have a mental health disorder, and over 700,000 New Yorkers suffer from symptoms of depression (Department of Health). Psychiatrists say “people experience panic attacks while riding the subway here in New York but have no problem riding the metro in Paris”. But these numbers should be of no surprise to anyone. New York is mostly enclosed spaces, crowded places, tall buildings and people with a frenetic pace.  New York basically screams anxiety everywhere you go – except for Central Park.

As more and more New Yorkers experience mental illnesses, many around them have created a stigma against them. Pervasive stereotypes have emerged by defining these people as dangerous, emotionally unstable, and unpredictable. This stigma has encouraged those with mental illnesses to avoid treatment for fear of being associated as someone who is not well. And this stigma continues to exists because mental health research institutions do not receive the same funding levels as other systems, individuals with mental illnesses do not share their personal stories, and the education available regarding symptoms and treatments of a mental illness is very low. “It has come to the point we need to declare war on mental illness and place a priority on funding innovative neurobiological research for better prevention, diagnosis, early intervention and treatment” (Borenstein, 2016).

But as technology progresses, more in-depth advances have been seen in this field. Now more than ever we are seeing a community slowly building up that wants to create a robust environment that encourages the path of recovery without fear of labels or diminished opportunities. Companies are aware that “mental health conditions cost employers more than $100 billion and 217 million lost workdays each year” (NAMI). And it is no secret that addressing this issue in the workplace and investing in mental health care will increase employee’s productivity, confidence, and overall retention.

The ultimate problem many us have is that we can’t seem to fit the time in our crazy schedules to work in our mental health. Many of us are in the office until late at night, and the last thing we want to do when getting home (after an intense subway ride) is to think how we can work on ourselves. Netflix and chill just seems like a better idea. But because of that, the office should be the place where the team gathers and has a moment to ultimately detach from our smart devices and our surroundings. This is why FoodtoEat has teamed up with MNDFL, New York’s premier meditation studio, for their new “Launch & Sit” program.

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With “Launch & Sit”, certified teachers bring meditation straight to your office, leaving behind the worry about squeezing this personal time into your busy week. MNDFL comes to you with a 30-minute guided meditation session and then finishes with a delicious, healthy meal catered by FoodtoEat. As a company that creates more and better opportunities for women, immigrants and minority groups, it is important for us to partner with companies that align with our values and help create a healthier workplace. Given the chaotic city we live in, it is necessary to have spaces that allow people to sit quietly and simply reset and reflect. A space to breathe is necessary from time to time.

 

 

Citations:
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/brain-and-behavior/201608/increase-funding-mental-illness-now
https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/releases/stigma-as-a-barrier-to-mental-health-care.html
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/humans-of-new-york-anxiety_n_56c4c6cbe4b08ffac1274edd
https://www.mndflmeditation.com/work.html
0 comments on “Get To Know Our Team: 20 Questions with Jaimie!”

Get To Know Our Team: 20 Questions with Jaimie!

Interested in learning more about the people who make the magic happen at FoodtoEat?! Here’s your chance! We’re giving you a behind the scenes look into our team and their personalities with a brief Q&A where they spill everything from their biggest fear to the most unusual thing they’ve ever eaten.

Next is Jaimie Adkins, our kickass saleswoman! Learn more about Jaimie below!

What’s your role at FoodtoEat?

I’m the Director of Business Development

What’s your favorite part of your job?

Creating a memorable experience for our clients and helping vendors grow their businesses.

What’s an accomplishment you’ve had at FoodtoEat that you’re really proud of?

Deepti (our founder) was asked to keynote an event called “Agents of Change” for IIDA, an architecture firm, at Lincoln Center. We also coordinated the catering through one of our local food vendors, Jaa Dijo Dom. At the event, Charles Chipengule, the owner of Jaa Dijo Dom, told me that it was surreal to be catering Lincoln Center, as it wasn’t long ago that he would be waiting here during the day with the homeless for his wife to pick him up after he got off of his shift as a dishwasher. And today he was catering Lincoln Center. Chills! That’s why we do what we do.

What’s something you worked on recently OR are working on right now that you’re excited about?

Our new partnership with Warby Parker! They’re so appreciative of the fact that our service helps them to streamline the food ordering process and the team is coming together to experience all kinds of new cuisines. As a company they have such a great mission; it’s so exciting to be feeding them!

Where did you grow up and where do you live now?

I grew up in beautiful Sussex County, New Jersey, home of Mountain Creek Ski Resort. Over the years, I’ve lived in San Francisco, New York, Philadelphia, Florida, and Alabama; and I’m currently back in my hometown!

What’s your favorite hobby?

Spending time outdoors: biking, kayaking, swimming, beaching

What’s something unique about you?

I’m a singer and a certified yoga instructor

If you could live anywhere, where would it be?

Palma de Mallorca

What’s your biggest pet peeve?

A disorganized fridge

What’s the most daring thing you’ve ever done?

Recently, the Vertigo water slide at Mountain Creek.

What’s one thing you’re determined to do in your lifetime?

Go to Machu Picchu

What do you wish you knew more about?

Bitcoin

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

Set your intention and be clear with your ask.

What are your top 3 favorite movies?

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Star Wars:  A New Hope and Ferris Bueller’s Day Off

What’s your biggest fear?

Sharks

What’s one motto you try to live your life by?

Lead with kindness

What’s your food kryptonite?

Crème Brulee

What’s one food or food trend that you can never get behind?

Fried oreos

What’s your favorite restaurant?

Get Juiced in Sussex County, NJ

What’s the most unusual thing you’ve ever eaten?

Escargot

0 comments on “Food Waste: Think. Eat. React.”

Food Waste: Think. Eat. React.

OVERVIEW

 “If food waste were a country, it would come in third after the United States and China in terms of global warming” (Frischmann, 2018). It is no secret to anyone that food waste, especially in the U.S., is a major problem. Every year, $210 billion is spent on food that is never eaten, amounting to 52 million tons sent to landfills annually. Another 10 million tons are discarded or left unharvested on farms. Yet, one in eight Americans (estimated 49 million) are food insecure. 

Food waste not only has social and economic implications, but also environmental. As 40% of food in the United States goes uneaten and sent to landfills, it contributes to 8% of total global greenhouse gas emissions. When the food rots in the landfill, it starts to release a chemical known as methane that is known to be “25 times more powerful than CO2” (Vogliano and Brown, 10). Only about 3% of the food in the U.S. is actually composted. 

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But food waste is not generic. Companies, consumers and countries contribute to food waste in different forms. In developing countries, for example, most food waste occurs before even reaching the market. Some reasons include inefficiency in transportation, equipment, packaging and storing the food. On the other hand, developed countries contribute in a larger extent to food waste once it has reached the consumer level. Big contributors are businesses such as grocery stores, institutions, catering departments and restaurants. Grocery stores specifically generate an absurd amount due to “cosmetic imperfections, expiration dates, damaged items and food returns” (Otten, 4). Other sectors such as restaurants generate due to “food trimmings, planned overproduction, spoilage and food served that customers do not eat” (Otten, 4). 

According to the National Resource Defense Council, “if we are able to just rescue 15% of the food waste in the U.S., we could save enough to feed 25 million citizens” (Move For Hunger). Surprisingly, consumers waste the most food compared to supermarkets and other businesses. 43% of the food waste occurs at home, equaling a loss of about $1,300-$2,200 for a family of four every year (Move For Hunger). Moreover, wasting food affects the environment not just from the gases that are released but also from the unnecessary excessive use of resources – 21% of fresh water, 18% of cropland, and 19% of fertilizer used to produce the food wasted.

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SOLUTIONS

As a community, we need to start working together to reduce the amount of food waste sent to landfills. Because solutions vary from corporations to restaurants to consumers, we’ve provided a general view of what solutions can be implemented in order to tackle this issue. 

For Businesses (grocery stores, catering departments, corporations, restaurants, organizations): 

  1. Improve data on food loss to estimate how much is being thrown away and how much should be bought 
  2. More accurate forecast demands based on consumer purchases to only bulk those items who sell the most
  3. Connect with organizations that provide surplus food to local shelters, after-school programs and other non-profit organizations.  
  4. If you are part of a company that caters often, partner with a catering service, like FoodtoEat, that knows how to portion correctly.
  5. Educate consumers on what the difference is between “use by” and “sell by” dates, on how to decrease food waste with more efficient storing methods and on how to better reduce, recover and recycle. 
  6. Invest in new technologies that can lengthen shelf life of fresh meat/poultry/fish, can delay the ripening of fruits and vegetables during shipping and storage, and monitor food waste in large communal kitchens to reduce costs. 
  7. Find creative ways to sell or avoid wasting food that has been mislabeled, bruised or overproduced.  

For Consumers:

  1. Move older food products to the front of the fridge so you remember to eat them!
  2. Take your restaurant leftovers with you and refrigerate them. That way, you don’t have to spend money on your next lunch at work. 
  3. This is going to sound weird, but check your garbage. Not to pick the leftovers, but to know what food you are tossing regularly so you buy less of it. 
  4. Compost excess food if you have a terrace or lawn. This will enrich your soil and help decrease greenhouse gasses. 
  5. Meal prep! By knowing what you have in your fridge, you know what you are missing in order to buy. 
  6. Most importantly, embrace the so-called “ugly” fruits and vegetables! They have exactly the same minerals, vitamins and nutrients as those more pleasing to the eye. This is BY FAR one of the biggest issues with major grocery chains. 
  7. Freeze! Freezing food is the best method to not let it rot. For example, those leafy greens that seem to soft for your salad are perfect to be put in the freezer for smoothies. 

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THE BOTTOM LINE

Food waste is a big challenge, but there are already numerous companies investing in technology to combat this battle as well as individuals taking action. Addressing this problem is beneficial for our communities, our bank accounts, our health, our soil, and individuals with very few resources.

While we need all possible solutions to be implemented in parallel, our daily decisions on how we produce, consume, and purchase is the most important contribution. We, the consumers, are the most significant cause of food waste (Robbins, 2018) since our way of thinking triggers companies’ actions. For example, if we demand more “ugly” products in our supermarkets, these chains will start promoting more and wasting less of them.

That being said, individuals being the main cause of food waste can be seen in a positive light. If we want to improve the ecosystem that surrounds us, we can change our decision making process to make businesses and organizations act quicker and smarter. In fact, we can all start today…

References:
0 comments on “Get To Know Our Team: 20 Questions with Ciara!”

Get To Know Our Team: 20 Questions with Ciara!

Interested in learning more about the people who make the magic happen at FoodtoEat?! Here’s your chance! We’re giving you a behind the scenes look into our team and their personalities with a brief Q&A where they spill everything from their biggest fear to the most unusual thing they’ve ever eaten.

First up, Ciara McKeown, whose been with the company for almost four years! Learn more about Ciara below!

What’s your role at FoodtoEat?

I’m the Marketing and Partnerships Manager.

What’s your favorite part of your job?

The tastings- I love trying different cuisines from local businesses throughout NYC that I couldn’t find myself.

What’s an accomplishment you’ve had at FoodtoEat that you’re really proud of?

Running the #IMadeYourFood campaign. I love speaking with the vendors one on one and really getting to know their stories: their background, how they got into food and what drives them to stay motivated in such a tough industry. Hearing about the sacrifices that some of them have made is truly moving and inspiring.

What’s something you worked on recently OR are working on right now that you’re excited about?

The #IMadeYourFood video series! Coming soon….

Where did you grow up and where do you live now?

I grew up in Floral Park, NY (a small town on Long Island). Now I live in Astoria.

What’s your favorite hobby?

Going out to dinner or working out

What’s something unique about you?

My name- it’s pronounced Kiera but spelled Ciara, which is the Gaelic spelling.

If you could live anywhere, where would it be?

Rome, Italy

What’s your biggest pet peeve?

Slow walkers

What’s the most daring thing you’ve ever done?

Skydiving

What’s one thing you’re determined to do in your lifetime?

Travel to Machu Picchu

What do you wish you knew more about?

Politics

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

“Never run after a man or a bus, there’s always another one coming” (thanks, Nana)

What are your top 3 favorite movies?

Good Will Hunting, 10 Things I Hate About You and Newsies

What’s your biggest fear?

Being buried alive

What’s one motto you try to live your life by?

“Pura Vida”

What’s your food kryptonite?

A massive chocolate chip cookie (or any cookie/dessert really)

What’s one food or food trend that you can never get behind?

Sushi

What’s your favorite restaurant?

Anything Italian or Mexican

What’s the most unusual thing you’ve ever eaten?

Tobiko

0 comments on “It’s Time to Be More MNDFL”

It’s Time to Be More MNDFL

When you’re constantly on the go (as all New Yorkers are) it’s hard to make the time to take care of yourself- body and mind. But with more than 46 million Americans struggling with mental illness on a daily basis, it’s so important to start taking the steps to make sure that you’re mentally and emotionally healthy.

Meditation is a mind-body practice where an individual focuses their mind on a specific object, thought or activity to train attention and awareness. It’s a skill that takes consistent practice to be comfortable with and has been proven to reduce stress,  anxiety and depression. We’re so excited to be partnering with MNDFL, New York’s premier meditation studio, for their new “Lunch & Sit” program, which brings meditation straight to your office! With “Lunch & Sit”, you don’t have to worry about squeezing a meditation class into your crazy work week. You can have MNDFL come to you with a 60 minute session where you’ll eat a delicious, healthy meal catered by a FoodtoEat vendor and finish out your lunch with a 30 minute guided meditation session. Interested? Keep reading to learn more about MNDFL and how you can be more mindful when eating.

What is MNDFL? MNDFL exists to enable humans to feel good. Our studios are meant to feel like home, or at least the spacious home you’d love to have in New York. We feature expert meditation teachers from a variety of traditions offering simple techniques in an accessible manner. Even if you think you can’t meditate, we have teachers who will prove you delightfully wrong! Our classes are 30, 45, and 60 minutes, and start at $15. When classes are not in session, the studio is open for self-guided practice. Bonus: everyone is super friendly!

When was MNDFL founded? MNDFL first opened it’s doors in November of 2015 in Greenwich Village and has since expanded to two additional locations on the Upper East Side and in Williamsburg. It was founded by Ellie Burrows and Lodro Rinzler.

What is the mission behind MNDFL? MNDFL’s mission is to make meditation accessible to as many human beings as possible. We believe in the Three T’s: Traditions + Teachers + Techniques. We are taking techniques that are 2,500 years or older and empowering our expert teachers to lead you from their traditions in a secular manner.

What are the benefits of meditation? Meditation has many benefits that science is now proving but a few to note are:

  • Decreases Stress and Builds Resilience
  • Lower Blood Pressure
  • Boosts Creativity & Problem-Solving
  • Supports Normalized Sleep
  • Increases Focus and Productivity
  • Increase Creative Thinking
  • Benefit Interpersonal Relationships

Why has MNDFL had so much success in New York City? In just 3 short years, we have seen over 200,000 cushions booked and are still in shock at the new humans passing through our doors daily. Let’s face it, New Yorker’s are stressed, busy, and hungry for connection. MNDFL has created a space that feels like the comfort of your home yet at the same time provides space to breath.

Why was MNDFL @ Work created? MNDFL @ Work was created out of the need to educate corporations on both the professional and personal benefits of building and maintaining a meditation practice without having to leave the office. Increased productivity, better focus and stress management are key factors in the desire to launch an in-office program, but the epidemic of burnt out employees nationwide has sent companies searching for a cure. Meditation is here to help.

After creating MNDFL @ Work, why did you see the need to launch the MNDFL “Lunch & Sit” program? Here at MNDFL we are continually looking for ways to make meditation more and more accessible. What better way to start committing to a practice than attaching it to something you do everyday, like getting lunch!

What is the “Lunch & Sit” program and what you hope to accomplish with it? The MNDFL “Lunch & Sit” program is 60 minutes dedicated to nourishing your body with wholesome food and nourishing your mind with guided meditation. The format is to open with 30 minutes of a healthy catered lunch followed by a 30 minute guided MNDFL meditation. We are hoping this program will allow offices to easily incorporate mental health into their company culture by attaching it to something that we already do on a regular basis.

What do you see for the future of MNDFL? We hope to continue educating and supporting human beings on building and maintaining a meditation practice. Although our efforts are currently focused on growing our NYC communities, we’d love to eventually spread this beyond just the east coast. If you’re not able to sit with us at any of our three NYC studio locations, we do offer MNDFL Video which allows you to sit with our expert teachers in the comfort of your home. 

MNDFL Eating Tips:

Even if your mind is going 60 miles per hour, try to mindfully show up for at least the first and last bite of your meal. Pause before you dive in, acknowledge your food then slowly take the first bite, savoring the taste. Notice the texture, flavor, and temperature of your meal. Chew it at a slower pace than normal. If you drift off after that first bite, okay, but then at the end of your meal repeat this process with your last bite too. That way you open and close your meal with grace and dignity.

Pause between bites. Often we are already lowering our utensil, rooting around our plate or bowl while chewing, already strategizing what we’re going to eat next. Instead of living for the next bite, train to rest in the present moment. Let the food anchor you in the here and now. One of the simplest ways to do that is to put down your utensil and savor the food you’re currently eating. When you have enjoyed and swallowed what you’re currently enjoying, only then do you pick up your spoon or fork and proceed with your meal.

Part of a fun meal is enjoying the company of those you’re eating with. One way to maximize that enjoyment is through mindful listening. Notice when you are deeply listening to your companions over a meal, versus spacing out or mentally having another conversation in your head. You are simply there with them, as opposed to waiting for your turn to speak. You can lay down your utensil, look the person in the eye, and aim to hear what they are trying to say. To deeply listen enables someone to feel your full heart.

 

 

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Reimagining Hospitality with WiHU

Women in Hospitality United, or WiHU, is a female founded organization that’s revolutionizing the hospitality industry. Created by Elizabeth Meltz, Erin Fairbanks and Liz Murray, they strive to challenge industry norms and provide women throughout the country with solutions to combat harassment and sexism. They’ve built a community where women are empowered to talk about the issues that they’ve faced and learn from each another so that they can find ways to make sure future generations of women don’t fall victim to the same cycle of inequality that has plagued this industry.

We were lucky enough to chat with Erin Fairbanks about the mission behind WiHU and what their organization is doing to create change in an industry that’s largely male-dominated. Not only were we impressed by the growth of their organization in such a short period of time but also by Erin’s passion for the work that she does and her commitment to reinventing how both men and women see the workplace.

How did you and your co-founders get into the hospitality industry? Elizabeth, Liz and myself have all made our way through a variety of positions in the industry. Elizabeth and I started as line cooks, her at Aureole and then Del Posto, myself at Savoy and then Gramercy Tavern. I went on to launch Farm Camp at Flying Pigs Farm and then joined Heritage Radio Network as its first Executive Director. Elizabeth created a department of food safety and sustainability for B&B Hospitality and now leads that program for Dig Inn. Liz got her start bartending in Mexico and as an expeditor at Dover and then managed people operations for Gramercy Tavern. She is now the Director of HR and Communications for the Marlow Collective.

How did WiHU start? In the fall of 2017, frustrated and outraged by the rash of #MeToo allegations across the restaurant industry, Elizabeth sent out an email to 100+ women in hospitality.  She and I organized a meeting and committed to hosting this group of industry stakeholders who could advance women-lead solutions. WiHU is an opt-in organization. To really be a part of what we’re creating, individuals need to show up and put in the work.  We connected with our third co-founder, Liz Murray, at the second WiHU meeting. It was Liz’s strong encouragement that lead to the formalizing of WiHU as a stand-alone entity.

What is the mission behind WiHU? Our mission is multifaceted. We work to build community by creating safer spaces to gather. We look for opportunities to foster leadership and champion the equitable advancement of all people through connection, mentorship, and resource sharing.  We empower our members by providing tools, training, advocacy, and support. Collectively our goal is to develop solutions and provide policies that set new standards for equity, accountability, and transparency in the industry.

Why did you feel there was a need for change in the hospitality industry? The #MeToo movement succeeded in shining a light on a long-accepted culture of harassment in the hospitality industry. We learned at the Solution Sprint (our signature event) that the challenge for our industry moving forward would be recognizing that you cannot effectively solve for harassment issues in a vacuum. To achieve true cultural change, the conversations around solutions must include a substantive look at the system’s shortcoming as related to: race, income distribution, access to resources, and power dynamics. We truly feel harassment is a symptom of the greater power imbalances that exist. We are working to dismantle and rebuild a a safer and more equitable industry.

What actions does your organization currently take to create that change? As a new non-profit we are working toward a vision of the future where WiHU training and consulting modules will be recognized as “must haves” for enlightened operators. We see WiHubs operating across the country, in partnership with other local or national groups, providing mentorship resources, creating region-specific best practice solutions, and acting as checks and balances for local hospitality communities.

We see the Solution Sprint happening across geographies, industry verticals, and being used as a mechanism for businesses to advance change. We anticipate a multitude of cross-sector and cross-industry partnerships designed to advance women of all races and orientations as we work toward achieving equity across all aspects of the hospitality industry. We see WiHU as the rocket fuel accelerating this change.

Our aim is to be a fiscally sound, thriving organization operating at a national level to serve the hospitality industry by developing solutions and providing policies that set new standards for equity, accountability, and transparency in the industry.  

Our focus areas for 2019 include:

  • The launch of a dynamic membership model that provides our community with an online network of supporters and access to tools, trainings and events while growing our national footprint.
  • Bringing our signature offering, the Solution Sprint, to conferences across the country to drive community-led solutions.   
  • Building out our board of directors and advisors and working to lay the strategic and financial framework to ensure the long term success of our work.

Why did this desire for change speak to you personally? I have long been dedicated to equity building through convening and experiential education. My work with WiHU is a natural extension of these efforts and a reflection of my personal north star–a vision of a future where all individuals, regardless of race or gender are able to thrive and bring their whole selves to work. You can learn more about my personal work history here.

What is the most challenging part of your work with WiHU? It’s important to remember that the change we are building toward is something that will happen on a generational timeline.  We are in a marathon, not a sprint. And it’s tough because the work feels incredibly urgent. We want to move toward change as quickly as possible but ultimately, to build a truly inclusive organization, we need to focus on listening, moving slowly and trusting the wisdom and insights of our members.  I truly believe our industry has the the talent and desire to create the change that we envision.

What is the most rewarding part of your work with WiHU? I love hearing directly from our members about how our work has impacted them. Notes like this one from Chef Meika Johnson in Houston, Texas really keep me going. “ You guys and the connections I’ve made through you guys have been such an inspiration to me. From the bottom of my heart thank you!!❤️”

*WiHU Founders Photo Courtesy of Bridget Shevlin